Criminal Justice

31 Mar 2017 A provincial anti-human trafficking law worthy of applause

Bill 96 – Ontario’s Anti-Human Trafficking Act, 2017 – was introduced in February by the Minister of the Status of Women, the Hon. Indira Naidoo-Harris. This bill is well worth supporting. In addition to creating a human trafficking awareness day (February 22), the bill makes two big changes to Ontario law. First, it enables a victim of human trafficking (or someone on their behalf) to get a restraining order against an alleged human trafficker. Second, it creates a tort of human trafficking. (A tort in law is a wrongful act that...

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24 Jun 2016 Ask your MP to support C-225 ‘Cassie and Molly’s Law’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlPv6spDN9Q What a great day for Canada! As you may know, we have been calling for a pre-born victims of crime law for over a year. In fact, it was one of three laws that we focussed on during lifeTOUR 2015 as having a real possibility of being introduced in the next 3 – 8 years. Now, only four months after the conclusion of lifeTOUR, the House of Commons is set to debate and vote on a bill that would protect pregnant women and their pre-born children! Bill C-225, introduced by Ms....

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24 Jul 2015 Highs and Lows of the 41st Canadian Parliament

On June 18th, the House of Commons adjourned, setting the stage for an election campaign that will end the 41st session of Parliament. This is an appropriate time to look back on the past four years and see what was accomplished, especially through the lens of ARPA Canada and the issues that we focus on. Pre-born Human Rights: When the Conservatives were handed a majority in the last federal election, many Christians hoped that pre-born human rights would finally be addressed. These hopes were in vain. Although some courageous MPs stood up for the pre-born, the leadership of all the political parties in the House of Commons did their utmost to suppress these efforts.   Motion 312, championed by MP Stephen Woodworth, was the first motion that held promise. It asked that “a special committee of the House of Commons be appointed and directed to review the declaration in Subsection 223(1) of the Criminal Code of Canada which states that a child becomes a human being only at the moment of complete birth.” Local ARPA chapters hosted presentations by Mr. Woodworth on this motion and many ARPA supporters encouraged MPs to support it. But with the party leaders all vocally opposed, the motion died in the House by a vote of 203 to 91. Yet Motion 312 reignited a discussion that was quiet for too long. Momentum for addressing this injustice was building.
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23 Mar 2015 Swedish government releases report demonstrating Canada’s law against prostitution will work

ARPA Canada has worked on the prostitution issue over the past few years. One of the legislative solutions we've lobbied hard for is for Canada to adopt the Swedish model concerning the sex trade. We were pleased when Parliament introduced and eventually passed a "made in Canada" version of the Swedish model. Four months later, Margaret Wente, of the Globe and Mail, has penned an op-ed pointing out the success of the Swedish model and the failures of the decriminalization route and the rather intriguing flip in ideological lines: progressives...

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03 Feb 2015 Marijuana: Personal liberty or State responsibility?

This past year, ARPA's legal counsel hosted a discussion about marijuana with two political thinkers, Matt Bufton of the Institute for Liberal Studies and Joseph Ben-Ami of the Arthur Meighen Institute. The discussion focused on laws pertaining to marijuana and whether they should liberalized or kept the way they are now. During the discussion, André was able to interject with questions from a Christian perspective, challenging both Matt and Joseph on their positions. Thanks to the able assistance of our IT guy, Nate Bosscher, we have captured the best parts...

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05 Nov 2014 Bill C-36 passes 3rd reading in the Senate

With thankfulness to God, we are pleased to announce that Bill C-36, Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, has passed third reading in the Senate and now only requires royal assent to become law. You helped table this law - thank you! As we have communicated before, we have been supportive of it since it was released last spring and are thankful it has come this far. The bill needs only to receive royal assent, after which it will become law - in time for the December 19th deadline provided by the...

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14 Jul 2014 Prostitution and the Media Silence

The Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights has been listening to witnesses this week (July 7-11, 2014) as it relates to Bill C-36, Protection of Communities and Exploited Person’s Act. The media has been reporting on the hearings, but the coverage has not been all that balanced. Just as we saw with the Bedford v. Canada court case where only Ms. Bedford and other privileged prostitutes had their voice heard in court, it seems the media wants to undermine the voices of those who worked in the industry but...

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02 Jul 2014 Report Card: Assessing Canada’s Conservative Government

The following article, "Report Card: Assessing Canada's Conservative Government on 10 Key Issues" was originally published in the Reformed Perspective magazine. It has been updated and included here as a reference item for our readers. You can download a PDF of the updated version, linked at the bottom of the text if you wish to print a copy. By Mark Penninga (Updated July, 2014) In a June 2011 article for Reformed Perspective I detailed 10 realistic goals that could be accomplished for our nation under this Conservative government if our leaders have the courage to lead and if citizens give them the encouragement and accountability to do so. Now that we are about halfway through this government’s mandate, how are we faring on these issues? 1. Give Aboriginals the responsibility and hope that belongs to all Canadians Grade: B+ Not long after ARPA published a policy report on this issue in 2012, we were very encouraged to see the federal government announce a number of bills and policies to increase accountability, equality, and opportunity for Canada's Aboriginal peoples. In June 2013, the First Nations Financial Transparency Act became law. Aboriginal MP Rob Clarke has also introduced a private member's bill C-428 entitled the Indian Act Amendment and Replacement Act. And the government has also taken steps towards allowing private property ownership on reserves and increasing parental responsibility in education. As encouraging as these changes are, they are small steps in light of the enormity of the problem. And given that the issue crosses into provincial responsibility, much more can also be done in having the provinces and federal government work towards a common vision. 2. Reform the Canadian Human Rights Commission Grade: C- In light of all the opposition from all sides of the political spectrum to problematic sections of the Canadian Human Rights Act, it is striking that it took a private member's bill (Brian Storseth's C-304) to finally abolish Section 13 in the summer of 2013. This was a huge victory, but the current government can't take much credit for it, apart from not actively opposing it. Much more can be done to reform or even abolish the Canadian Human Rights Commission.
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17 Jun 2014 Restorative Justice Transcripts Now Available

We are pleased to provide you with the written transcripts of the speech on Restorative Justice that Dr. Smith gave on May 6, 2013. The speech was presented to Parliamentarians, the attendees of the 2014 God & Government conference and guests of not-for-profit agencies in English, however we have provided links to the speech in both English and French. If you would prefer to listen to Dr. Smith's speech, you may listen to the Lighthouse News broadcast here. Please share this transcript with your MP or others that you...

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15 May 2014 Committee Work on the Hill

Special report by ARPA Canada intern Mark Luimes If you ask most Canadians what they think about parliamentary procedure, they will typically recall question period - the energetic, overly partisan war of words that is publicly televised on CPAC (Cable Public Affairs Channel). Many will come away from question period unimpressed with the seeming inability of MPs to give straight answers or engage in meaningful debate on government issues. What most people don't realize, however, is that question period provides a poor picture of the life and work of our parliamentarians. In reality, a significant part of the real work is done in small, multi-partisan committees, characterized by higher levels of co-operation, decorum, and policy analysis than what is typically displayed in question period.
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